Articles

Cloud IaaS Provider Roundup: Best of the Best

We’ve been comparing cloud service providers for years now, pitting Rackspace against Azure, Azure against DigitalOcean, DigitalOcean against Linode, and so on down the line to the point that we’re just plum sick of it. Just kidding! Who could ever tire of such a thing? Cloud computing invokes such a rush that it almost takes your mind off of poor, old, dead as an R/C helicopter Radio Shack. And as the cloud space is in constant flux, many of the previous comparisons could be a touch out of date. So we figured our options were either (a) mope around, morosely pondering the inevitability of death and everlasting irrelevance, or (b) hold a Battle Royale to determine the Best Cloud Computing Service for Now and At Least the Immediate Future! 

Filed under: amazon, google, ec2, AWS, cloud, IaaS, rackspace, Azure, digitalocean, Google Compute Engine, SoftLayer, linode

Heroku vs EC2

With the increasing importance of cloud computing, services like Amazon’s EC2 on AWS and Heroku are coming under more scrutiny. Even better for the consumer, the increasing number of such services means more choice in the market. But with this increased choice comes an increased level of confusion, because it’s often difficult to do an apples-to-apples comparison of the various services. Even worse, their offerings aren’t strictly in the same domains, but let’s take a stab at it.

Filed under: amazon, ec2, cloud, IaaS, Cloud Computing, Heroku

Docker vs LXC

Shipping Containers and Compute?

LXC (LinuX Containers) is a OS-level virtualization technology that allows creation and running of multiple isolated Linux virtual environments (VE) on a single control host. These isolation levels or containers can be used to either sandbox specific applications, or to emulate an entirely new host. LXC uses Linux’s cgroups functionality, which was introduced in version 2.6.24 to allow the host CPU to better partition memory allocation into isolation levels called namespaces . Note that a VE is distinct from a virtual machine (VM), as we will see below.

Filed under: linux, IaaS, docker, lxc