UpGuard Blog

The Password Security Checklist

Yesterday you might have read about Facebook founder and user Mark Zuckerberg’s social media accounts getting “hacked.” Hacked is maybe not the right word here, since many people believe Zuck’s password was among the 117 million leaked LinkedIn passwords recently posted online. If this is true, it means that Zuckerberg used the same password for multiple websites, allowing the damage done by the LinkedIn hack to spread into other areas. If you have or want a job, chances are you also have a LinkedIn account, and if you had one back in 2012, it was probably one of the compromised accounts from that incident. Do you still use that password anywhere? Our 9 step password security checklist will help you secure your accounts, whether you’re a billionaire CEO or just someone who likes to post funny cat videos.

Filed under: security, cybersecurity, data breach, passwords, checklist

The Email Security Checklist

You’ve hardened your servers, locked down your website and are ready to take on the internet. But all your hard work was in vain, because someone fell for a phishing email and wired money to a scammer, while another user inadvertently downloaded and installed malware from an email link that opened a backdoor into the network. Email is as important as the website when it comes to security. As a channel for social engineering, malware delivery and resource exploitation, a combination of best practices and user education should be enacted to reduce the risk of an email-related compromise. By following this 13 step checklist, you can make your email configuration resilient to the most common attacks and make sure it stays that way.

Filed under: configuration testing, cyber risk, IT operations, email, checklist

The Website Security Checklist

Putting a website on the internet means exposing that website to hacking attempts, port scans, traffic sniffers and data miners. If you’re lucky, you might get some legitimate traffic as well, but not if someone takes down or defaces your site first. Most of us know to look for the lock icon when we're browsing to make sure a site is secure, but that only scratches the surface of what can be done to protect a web server. Even SSL itself can be done many ways, and some are much better than others. Cookies store sensitive information from websites; securing these can prevent impersonation. Additionally, setting a handful of configuration options can protect both your full website presence against both manual and automated cyber attacks, keeping your customer’s data safe from compromise. Here are 13 steps to harden your website and greatly increase the resiliency of your web server.

Filed under: security, apache, IIS, nginx, webscan, checklist