UpGuard Blog

Preventing Data Breaches

Data is being mishandled. Despite spending billions on cybersecurity solutions, data breaches continue to plague private companies, government organizations, and their vendors. The reason cybersecurity solutions have not mitigated this problem is that the overwhelming majority of data exposure incidents are due to misconfigurations, not cutting edge cyber attacks. These misconfigurations are the result of process errors during data handling, and often leave massive datasets completely exposed to the internet for anyone to stumble across.

Filed under: data breaches, S3, github, cloudleaks, rsync

How Can Cloud Leaks Be Prevented?

When we examined the differences between breaches, attacks, hacks, and leaks, it wasn’t just an academic exercise. The way we think about this phenomenon affects the way we react to it. Put plainly: cloud leaks are an operational problem, not a security problem. Cloud leaks are not caused by external actors, but by operational gaps in the day-to-day work of the data handler. The processes by which companies create and maintain cloud storage must account for the risk of public exposure.

Filed under: AWS, cyber risk, process, Procedures, third-party vendor risk, cloudleaks

Why Do Cloud Leaks Matter?

Introduction

Previously we introduced the concept of cloud leaks, and then examined how they happen. Now we’ll take a look at why they matter. To understand the consequences of cloud leaks for the organizations involved, we should first take a close look at exactly what it is that’s being leaked. Then we can examine some of the traditional ways information has been exploited, as well as some new and future threats such data exposures pose.

Filed under: AWS, process, cloudleaks

Why Do Cloud Leaks Happen?

Making Copies

In our first article on cloud leaks, we took a look at what they were and why they should be classified separately from other cyber incidents. To understand how cloud leaks happen and why they are so common, we need to step back and first take a look at the way that leaked information is first generated, manipulated, and used. It’s almost taken as a foregone conclusion that these huge sets of sensitive data exist and that companies are doing something with them, but when you examine the practice of information handling, it becomes clear that organizing a resilient process becomes quite difficult at scale; operational gaps and process errors lead to vulnerable assets, which in turn lead to cloud leaks.

Filed under: AWS, misconfiguration, cloudleaks

What Are Cloud Leaks?

Breaches, Hacks, Leaks, Attacks

It seems like every day there’s a new incident of customer data exposure. Credit card and bank account numbers; medical records; personally identifiable information (PII) such as address, phone number, or SSN— just about every aspect of social interaction has an informational counterpart, and the social access this information provides to third parties gives many people the feeling that their privacy has been severely violated when it’s exposed.

Filed under: AWS, Azure, cyber risk, IT operations, S3, cloudleaks