UpGuard Blog

Minimizing Cyber Risk in Microsoft Environments

Microsoft’s enterprise software powers the majority of large environments. Though often hybridized with open source solutions and third party offerings, the core components of Windows Server, Exchange, and SQL Server form the foundation of many organizations’ data centers. Despite their prevalence in the enterprise, Microsoft systems have also carried a perhaps unfair reputation for insecurity, compared to Linux and other enterprise options. But the insecurities exploited in Microsoft software are overwhelmingly caused by misconfigurations and process errors, not flaws in the technology— patches are not applied on a quick and regular cadence; settings are not hardened according to best practices; dangerous defaults are left in place in production; unused modules and services are not disabled and removed.

Microsoft has come a long way to bring its out-of-the-box security up to snuff with its famous usability, not to mention introducing command-line and programmatic methods by which to manage their systems. But even now, the careful control necessary to run a secure and reliable data center on any platform can be difficult to maintain all of the time at scale.

Filed under: SQL, IIS, Microsoft, Windows, cyber risk, policies, cybersecurity

11 Steps to Secure SQL

Whether you’re running Microsoft’s SQL Server (soon to run on Linux) or the open source MySQL, you need to lockdown your databases to keep your data private and secure. These 11 steps will guide you through some of the basic principles of database security and how to implement them. Combined with a hardened web server configuration, a secure database server will keep an application from becoming an entry point into your network and keep your data from ending up dumped on the internet. When provisioning a new SQL server, remember to factor security in from the get-go; it should be a part of your regular process, not something applied retroactively, as some key security measures require fundamental configuration changes for insecurely installed database servers and applications.

Filed under: SQL, security, mysql, database

Controlling SQL Configuration Drift Revisited

It's a topic that comes up frequently for us here at UpGuard. Our customers are always keen to know how they can take control and simplify their configuration management processes. We've all experienced at some time or another that issue that was the result of a database migration that didn't complete, a column that has mysteriously changed data type or an old version of a stored proc or view being restored to a new database.

Filed under: SQL, Configuration Drift

Monitoring Database Nodes to Remediate Configuration Drift

Controlling database configuration drift is a tricky subject. It's a topic that comes up frequently for us here at UpGuard and customers are always keen to know how they can go about taking control and simplify their configuration management processes. We've all experienced at some time or another that issue that was the result of a database migration that didn't complete, a column that has mysteriously changed data type or an old version of a stored proc or view being restored to a new database.

Filed under: guardrail, SQL, configuration management, Configuration Drift